Story of hope and imagining change

 

imagine1

This last week I have had a few conversations with colleagues ad friends about the stories that children carry with them, or stories that we hear from family members and other professionals about the child. With the children that we see, these are often negative stories, a story about how the child will be violent, challenging, can become easily overwhelmed. The challenge when we hear these stories is that we can make a judgment before we have even met the child. Sometimes these stores can be so huge, that we struggle to see the child in the story.

I don’t think this is unique to education, I have friends who work in other agencies with children and young people, and they also say sometimes it is hard to see the child within the story. The problem when we take on big, negative stories is that our expectations, our hopes, and plans can become narrow for the child.

It feels like we need to hold the stories lightly, to be aware of what has gone before, but also to have hope for the future and imagine what may become possible. I am aware that as a nurture worker myself and my colleague’s role is to have hope for the child, when we start a piece of work we need to believe that there will be change, we need to help everyone see the story can be different.

Changing the story is important for the adults but especially for the child, as a nurture team we mainly work with 4 yr olds, some of those 4 yr olds arrive at school already having a story about themselves, that they are naughty, or they are bad. These are words we would never use, but they are words that the child has taken on. Words are powerful. When the words over you and around you and about you are negative, that is hard to break away from.

As a team we use Thrive assessment tool, this talks about telling a new story about the child, a story about their unique abilities, a story of hope and imagining something different.

Photo- carving by my husband Iain cotton

2 thoughts on “Story of hope and imagining change”

  1. Just wanted to say thanks properly for the Kinderly webinar last night. I was so tired all I could muster was a “thanks x” at the end. Really enjoyable webinar with lots of good advice. I’m really working in looking after myself these days with the hopefully added bonus that it benefits my family and the children I look after too. Looking into the links you suggested too, all look really interesting. Thanks again, Kathleen Sides.

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Like

    1. Thank you Kathleen that is so kind of you to take the time to send this message. I really appreciate it. I must admit I found doing a webinar very strange!, I have realised I respond quite a lot to being able to see people when I am training so just having a screen with my notes and my face felt very odd!. I am so pleased it was helpful for you. Enjoy adding in some more self care.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s